2005 Annual Report

INTRODUCTION

The mission of the Pegasus Foundation is to improve the welfare of wild and domestic animals in the United States, the Bahamas, the Caribbean, and on Native American lands by reducing animal suffering and overpopulation, and by protecting wildlife habitats. The Foundation believes that all forms of life warrant compassion and respect, and that human beings must strive for a world that is humane for all living things.

Through a strategy of engaged philanthropy, the Pegasus Foundation serves as a catalyst to help organizations and individuals achieve their potential by forming partnerships, leveraging resources, and educating the public. The Pegasus Foundation seeks to inspire collaborations by organizing conferences and meetings, and facilitating communications. Partnership building is an integral part of how the Pegasus Foundation operates.

PEGASUS FOUNDATION 2005 HIGHLIGHTS

Some of the highlights of the Pegasus Foundation’s work in 2005 include the following:

* The Equine Rescue and Adoption Foundation signed a memorandum of agreement with the Pegasus Foundation to rehabilitate rescued horses for adoption at the Foundation’s Caring Fields Animal Sanctuary in Palm City, Florida.

* As part of the expansion of the Caribbean Animal Welfare Initiative, the Pegasus Foundation conducted site visits to 11 islands of the Bahamas and the Caribbean. Equipment, supplies and training materials were distributed to 20 islands; technical assistance and consultation were provided to others.

* Pegasus staff organized the Florida Endangered Species Network with the Florida Office of Defenders of Wildlife, focusing on a media strategy aimed at raising public awareness of endangered species and their contribution to Florida’s quality of life.

* The Pegasus Foundation hosted the 2005 Animal Grantmakers Conference in West Palm Beach, Florida. The conference was attended by 25 foundations and included field trips to various Florida animal protection programs.

CARING FIELDS ANIMAL SANCTUARY YEAR IN REVIEW

All beings seek for happiness; so let your compassion extend itself to all.
–Mahavamsa

This quote, which appears on all signs at the Caring Fields Animal Sanctuary, reflects the overall mission of this Pegasus Foundation affiliate in Palm City, Florida. The sanctuary was established for horse and cat rescue, education and disaster response.

One of the year’s highlights was the addition of the Equine Rescue and Adoption Foundation (ERAF), which signed a memorandum of agreement with the Pegasus Foundation in May to rehabilitate rescued horses for adoption at the Caring Fields Animal Sanctuary. Ten horses were housed at the Caring Fields by the end of the year.

The Hobe Sound Animal Protection League (HSAPL), a cat rescue and adoption program also housed at the Caring Fields, continued to build its capacity throughout 2005, providing care for an average of 60 cats at any given time. Throughout the year, HSAPL found homes for 100 cats and spayed or neutered 175 cats. The organization also expanded its outdoor cattery to include a feline leukemia section.

A celebration was held on May 28 at the Caring Fields to welcome ERAF and to recognize the continued success of HSAPL. The event drew 125 people and featured a vegetarian Mexican fiesta, a Native American blessing, and recognition of volunteers. A special presentation was made to recognize the Caring Fields Animal Sanctuary and the Pegasus Foundation founders Barbara and Charles Birdsey.

In November, as part of the Animal Grantmakers conference hosted by the Pegasus Foundation in West Palm Beach, representatives of 30 foundations visited the Caring Fields Animal Sanctuary. During the Animal Grantmakers tour, special recognition was given to Marc Dinnerstein of the Dinnerstein Foundation for his generous support of the Caring Fields.

In addition to addressing the impact of three hurricanes in two years and conducting the needed repairs, improvements at the Caring Fields in 2005 focused on making the property more environmentally friendly and more suitable for wildlife. These included the following:
* A studio apartment was constructed in the barn with a state-of-the-art composting toilet.
* Solar panels on gates and fences were added to provide an electric charge that protects horses and keeps intruders out.
* Wildlife habitat was created with debris from trees felled during hurricanes.
Various species of wildlife (some of which are endangered or threatened) now use the Caring Fields as a corridor or temporary home, including river otters, Eastern gray foxes, indigo snakes, roseate spoonbills, wood storks, sandhill cranes, and other waterfowl.

Plans for 2006 include:
* Launch of an education center with programs for children and adults. The center will utilize an existing apartment on the property that will be upgraded with environmentally friendly features.
* Designation of the property as a wildlife sanctuary by the Humane Society of the United States’ Wildlife Land Trust.
* Addition of native plants to the pond to further attract fish, birds, and other wildlife.
* Enhancement of the swale that dissects the property to improve its suitability as wildlife habitat.

CARIBBEAN ANIMAL WELFARE INITIATIVE YEAR IN REVIEW

As part of the expansion of the Caribbean Animal Welfare Initiative, the Pegasus Foundation focused efforts in 2005 on site visits to 11 islands, planning for the May 2006 Caribbean Animal Welfare conference, building collaborations with other international animal welfare groups and with island governments, and providing resource materials, supplies and equipment to 20 islands.

The initial focus of the 2005 site visits was to visit some of the islands most impacted by the devastating 2004 hurricane season, including Grenada, Grand Cayman, Jamaica and Grand Bahama. Many of the Foundation’s site visits were conducted jointly with Humane Society International and the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals.

Pegasus also strengthened its partnership in the Caribbean with the World Society for the Protection of Animals (WSPA). Pegasus became a WSPA member society, and WSPA joined Pegasus, HSI and ASPCA in co-sponsoring and planning the May 2006 conference.

In addition to distributing resource materials during site visits, the Foundation also provided grants and in-kind donations to programs operating in the Cayman Islands, The Bahamas, Jamaica, Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, Antigua, and Grenada.

Some island-specific highlights of 2005 included the following:
* The U.S. Virgin Islands passed an animal cruelty bill, thanks to the local efforts of the Humane Society of St. Thomas, the St. Croix Animal Welfare Center, and the Animal Care Center of St. John, and combined with international support from American Humane Association, the ASPCA, the Humane Society of the United States, WSPA, and the Pegasus Foundation.
* Pegasus introduced the Grenada Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (GSPCA) to several volunteer veterinary resources, including a long-term volunteer who is spending a year in Grenada and a U.S.-based volunteer veterinary team that began planning with the GSPCA for a spay/neuter clinic to be held in early 2006.
* The Foundation strengthened relationships with Bahamas humane societies through site visits, disaster funding, resources, and ongoing communications and assistance. After Hurricane Wilma struck Grand Bahama in late 2005, Pegasus helped generate $15,000 in cash and in-kind donations to the Humane Society of Grand Bahama.

The Pegasus Foundation’s focus for 2006 will be on planning and implementing the May 2006 Caribbean Animal Welfare Conference in Antigua, which will include training on disaster preparedness and response, animal cruelty investigations, responsible animal welfare, and humane education. Other 2006 activities will include site visits and ongoing grantmaking throughout the Caribbean region.

OTHER PEGASUS FOUNDATION ACTIVITIES IN 2005

Florida Endangered Species Network

In 2005, Pegasus staff organized the Florida Endangered Species Network with the Florida Office of Defenders of Wildlife. The Network aims to bring greater cohesiveness, communication, and support to endangered species activists at local and state levels while building the grassroots capacity needed to assist with national endangered species issues. Over 35 representatives from the non-governmental and scientific community currently participate in the Florida Endangered Species Network. Network organizers hope to provide innovative ideas for endangered species advocates in Florida and to exchange these ideas with other states around the country.

One of the key initiatives of the Network is a media strategy designed to raise public awareness of endangered species and their contribution to Florida’s quality of life as well as to highlight the constructive role of the conservationist in long-term community planning. A plan was developed to immerse reporters in the natural world by engaging them in extraordinary experiences with endangered species. Media trips conducted in 2005 included an August visit to a green turtle nesting area in Melbourne Beach, and a December tracking expedition in Etoniah Creek State Forest in northern Florida to observe signs left behind by black bears.

Outreach and Education

Pegasus outreach and education efforts in 2005 focused on conference funding and implementation, as well as serving on boards and providing consultation to a number of organizations, including the Cape Cod Stranding Network (Massachusetts), Friends of Centennial Valley (Montana), Green Belt Movement (Kenya), International Center for Earth Concerns (California and Kenya), Kayenta Animal Care and Control (Arizona), and the Second Chance Center for Animals (Arizona).

2005 PEGASUS FOUNDATION GRANTS

In addition to operation of the Caring Fields Animal Sanctuary and the Caribbean Animal Welfare Initiative, as well as the outreach and consultation provided to many organizations, the Pegasus Foundation provided grants in three primary program areas: companion animal welfare, wildlife and habitat protection, and education and outreach.

Companion Animal Welfare: The Pegasus Foundation focused its support of companion animal programs on spay-neuter services and humane education in several regions, including Florida, Native American lands and the islands of the Caribbean.

Wildlife and Habitat Protection: The Pegasus Foundation centered its wildlife programming on broad public outreach efforts designed to protect species significant to a region’s ecosystem, specifically bison in Montana and endangered species in Florida. Additional funds supported wildlife and habitat protection programs on Cape Cod, Massachusetts.

Education and Outreach: The Pegasus Foundation supported several special initiatives that educate the general public and engage others in animal and environmental protection. In addition, the Foundation organized trainings and meetings, distributed resources, and developed communications networks among grantees with similar interests.

Companion Animals – $69,800

Caribbean animal welfare
St. Croix Animal Welfare Center (humane education) – $2,500
Animal Care Center of St. John (feral cat spay/neuter) – $2,500
Humane Society of St. Thomas (humane education) – $5,000
Vieques Humane Society (spay/neuter) – $2,500
Puerto Rico Animal Welfare Society (Neutersol) – $2,500
Save a Sato (attend HSUS Animal Care Expo) – $500
Save a Sato (spay/neuter) – $2,000
Humane Society of Puerto Rico (spay/neuter) – $5,000
Cayman Islands Humane Society (equipment) – $3,000
International Veterinary Assistance (attend HSUS Animal Care Expo) – $1,000
Puppy Angels (Grenada spay/neuter) – $2,500
International Wildlife Coalition (Antigua spay/neuter) – $3,500
Cayman Islands animal welfare needs assessment study – $6,000
2006 Caribbean Animal Welfare Conference – $2,500
Other support (books, resource materials, shipping donated veterinary supplies) – $2,800

Native American animal welfare
Second Chance Center for Animals Plateauland Mobile Veterinary Clinic – $7,500
Navajo Nation Puppy Adoption Program (equipment) – $4,000
Kayenta Animal Control and Shelter (training) – $1,000

Feral cat rescue and rehabilitation
Hobe Sound Animal Protection League – $2,500

Horse rescue and rehabilitation
Equine Rescue and Adoption Foundation – $7,000

Disaster response:
Humane Society of the United States (Tsunami response) – $1,000
Humane Society of the United States (Hurricane Katrina response) – $1,000
Humane Society International (Bahamas hurricane response) – $1,000
Kohn Foundation (Bahamas hurricane response) – $1,000

Wildlife and Habitat – $62,000

Yellowstone bison protection
Humane Society of the United States – $15,000

Responsible boater education
Busch Wildlife Sanctuary (Sharing Our Waterways with Wildlife) – $10,000

Cape Cod marine mammals
Cape Cod Stranding Network – $5,000
Center for Coastal Studies – $5,000

Cape Cod wildlife protection
HSUS Cape Wildlife Center – $5,000

Elephant protection
Friends of Conservation (Anne Kent Taylor Fund anti-snaring program)- $1,500
Elephant Sanctuary at Hohenwald – $3,500

New Hampshire wildlife initiatives
Loon Preservation Committee – $1,500

Endangered species
Endangered Species Coalition – $500
Defenders of Wildlife (Florida Endangered Species Network) – $5,000

Other
Busch Wildlife Sanctuary – $10,000

Education and Outreach – $15,500

Compassionate Traveler
PETA – $10,000

Pegasus Awards
Animal law awards program – $500

Other
Rachel’s Network – $5,000

MEMBERSHIPS

The Pegasus Foundation is a member of the following organizations:
Animal Grantmakers
Cape Cod Stranding Network
CGBD Marine Funders Working Group
Endangered Species Coalition
Environmental Grantmakers Association
Everglades Coalition
Florida Environmental Funders
Greater Yellowstone Coalition
Manatee Coalition
Marine Mammal Funders
Marine Mammal Protection Coalition
Martin County Conservation Alliance
World Society for the Protection of Animals

PEGASUS FOUNDATION GOALS FOR 2006

Help Us Help Them Fund: Pegasus staff will develop and implement the Help Us Help Them Fund using proceeds from the Jupiter Island Golf Tournament to support eligible and qualified animal welfare organizations.

Caring Fields Animal Sanctuary: Sanctuary improvements will continue to add “green” features in preparation for designation of the property as a wildlife sanctuary by the Humane Society of the United States Wildlife Land Trust. Pegasus staff will launch the Charles and Barbara Birdsey Education Center at the Caring Fields Animal Sanctuary in June with a two-day Animal Emergency Services Training.

2006 Caribbean Animal Welfare Conference: Pegasus staff will plan and implement the May Caribbean Animal Welfare Conference in Antigua with the Antigua and Barbuda Humane Society as local host and three primary co-sponsors: the World Society for the Protection of Animals, Humane Society International/Humane Society of the United States, and the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. The conference will provide training on disaster preparation and response, animal cruelty investigations, humane education, and responsible animal welfare.

Caribbean Resource Development: The Foundation will work with a consultant to identify additional resources to support Caribbean animal welfare.

Native American Animal Welfare: Pegasus staff will continue to support the Kayenta Animal Control and Shelter in Arizona by building capacity and assisting with program and partnership development.

Boston University event featuring Nobel Peace Laureate Wangari Mathai: The Pegasus Foundation will provide the honorarium for Wangari Mathai’s appearance at a Boston University event on March 22. Funds will support the Green Belt Movement’s environmental programs in Kenya and elsewhere.

Consulting services and technical assistance: Pegasus will continue to provide guidance to various programs including Friends of Centennial Valley, International Center for Earth Concerns, and the Green Belt Movement.

Yellowstone bison: The Foundation will continue to coordinate efforts with organizations working to develop new partnerships that will lead to acquisition of safe habitat for Yellowstone bison.

Alliance for Contraception in Cats and Dogs (ACCD): Pegasus will co-sponsor the ACCD’s November 2006 International Symposium on Nonsurgical Contraceptive Methods for Pet Population Control, to be held in Washington, DC.

Cape Cod Wildlife: Pegasus will continue support for wildlife programs on Cape Cod, Massachusetts.

CONTACT INFORMATION

Pegasus Foundation Staff:

Peter A. Bender, Executive Director
The Pegasus Foundation
27 Merrimack Street
Concord, New Hampshire 03301 USA
Phone: 603.225.3918
Fax: 603.225.4624

J. Kevin Hertell, Florida Representative and Caring Fields Animal Sanctuary Manager
The Pegasus Foundation
P.O. Box 3093
West Palm Beach, Florida 33402 USA
Phone: 561.310.5779

Anne Ostberg, Program Officer
The Pegasus Foundation
27 Merrimack Street
Concord, New Hampshire 03301 USA
Phone: 603.225.3918
Fax: 603.225.4624

The Pegasus Foundation – Cape Cod Office
1000 Main Street, P.O. Box 79
West Barnstable, Massachusetts 02668 USA

Pegasus Foundation Trustees:
Peter A. Bender, The Pegasus Foundation, Concord, New Hampshire
David Fitts, Esq., Day, Berry & Howard, LLP, Boston, Massachusetts
George Malloy, C.P.A., P.C., Wellfleet, Massachusetts
Steve Ziobrowski, Esq., Day, Berry & Howard, LLP, Boston, Massachusetts

The Pegasus Foundation
c/o Day, Berry & Howard, LLP
One International Place
Boston, Massachusetts 02110 USA

0 replies

Leave a Reply

Want to join the discussion?
Feel free to contribute!

Leave a Reply